Guides
Guides from our travels

Destinations
Day-to-day details & all costs of our trips

Deals
Deals from other travel websites

Postal Stamps Memorabilia
Make a memory of every place you visit by getting a postal stamp from local post office

Tips
Do's, don'ts, advice, how-to's




Effects of highway on wild-beast migration in Serengeti

April 5, 2011

Serengeti Migration

Serengeti Migration


eTurboNews reports that the annual migration of wild beast has begun in the low-grass plains between the Serengeti and Ngorongoro. The great herds are starting their move en masse, final destination being the rich pastures of the Masai Mara in neighboring Kenya, which is part of the greater Serengeti trans-boundary ecosystem.

Between the end of March/beginning of April and late June/early July, when they are expected to cross the Mara river, the hundreds of thousands of wildebeest and zebra have to run a gauntlet of predators, lions, cheetah, leopard, hyenas, foxes, and hunting dogs as they migrate through hostile territory.

But the government of Tanzania has declared their intention to go ahead with a new highway across the migration route. The government has claimed the highway is “to serve the people,” but in reality, the highway will serve powerful mining interests. The mining activity will in turn in threaten the flamingo breeding grounds at Lake Natron where in particular gold mining brings with it a host of pollution problems. Many say Tanzania is ill equipped to deal with this mining activity and the government is risking the poisoning of large swathes of land around the mines and processing plants.

Estimates presented by studies of globally-respected and renowned institutions with experience in monitoring the Serengeti/Masai Mara migration, speaks of a reduction of the herds to a fraction of their present size.

So go ahead and visit now as it may not be there for much longer in the future.



Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

All websites use cookies. It's the 21st century! What's a cookie?!

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close